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Our prices are:

12oz – $1.25
16oz – $1.50
20oz – $1.75

Reusable Tea bags – $1.00

Raw Tea Blends are all $5.50 to take home

This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

please be advised:
you should always consult with your doctor
before making any changes to your diet!!

The mixes we offer are:

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Calendula Flowers

Calendula is a well-known herb and uplifting ornamental garden plant that has been used topically, ceremonially, and as a dye and food plant for centuries. Dried flower as a tea, tincture, or infused oil.

 

The fresh plant can be prepared as a tea or tincture.
The fresh flowers are edible.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: Persons with allergies to other members of the Asteraceae family (such as feverfew, chamomile, or Echinacea species) should exercise caution with calendula, as allergic cross-reactivity to Asteraceae plants is common.

 

Ginger Root

Ginger has been valued as a zesty spice and a reliable herb for centuries, with the first recorded uses found in ancient Sanskrit and Chinese texts.3,4 It has also been utilized in Greek, Roman, Arabic, and Unani Tibb traditional medicine practices3,4 and is now a widely known herb in most parts of the world. It is a flavoring agent in beer, soft drinks, candies, and a staple spice and condiment in many countries. Ginger essential oil has been used in a vast array of cosmetics and perfumes.5 Further, its properties, ranging from alleviating upset stomach to providing general relief, are now being substantiated through a vast array of scientific studies. 

HERBAL ACTIONS: Appetite stimulant, carminative,5 anti-emetic3,7 peripheral circulatory stimulant,19 diaphorhetic, cardiotonic2emmenagogue

USES AND PREPARATIONS

Dried chopped rhizome for tea, powdered for tea or spice, powdered and encapsulated, or tinctured

fresh rhizome as a condiment, fresh tea, poultice, juice, tincture, or essential oil and oleoresin

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: No known precautions.

 

Licorice Root

Licorice root is one of the most widely used medicinal herbs worldwide and is the single most used herb in Chinese medicine today. It was used by the Egyptians as a flavoring for a drink called Mai-sus, and large quantities were found in the tomb of King Tut for his trip into the afterlife. Pliny the Elder recommended it to clear the voice and alleviate thirst and hunger. Dioscides, when traveling with Alexander the Great, recommended that his troops carry and use licorice to help with stamina for long marches, as well as for thirst in areas of drought. In the Middle Ages it was taken to alleviate the negative effects of highly spicy or overcooked food. It was also used for flavoring tobacco, and as a foaming agent in fire extinguishers and beer. In a recent survey of Western medical herbalists, licorice ranked as the 10th most important herb used in clinical practice. An astonishing number of Chinese herbal formulas (over 5,000) use licorice to sweeten teas and to “harmonize” contrasting herbs. Its first documented use dates back to the time of the great Chinese herbal master Zhang Zhong Zhing, about 190 AD, but it was certainly used for many centuries prior to this. In 1914 the Chicago Licorice Company began to sell Black Vines, the first in a very long line of licorice based modern candies.

Teas, tinctures, and in encapsulations. The whole sticks and slices may be chewed straight and are pleasant tasting.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: Not for use in pregnancy except under the supervision of a qualified healthcare practitioner. Not for use in persons with hypertension, liver disorders, edema, severe kidney insufficiency, low blood potassium, or heart disease.

 

Coltsfoot

It was so popular in Europe at one time that French pharmacists painted its flowers on their doorposts. It was brought to the American colonies from Europe. Before the plant flowers, it resembles butterbur enough that old herbals caution against confusing the two. Specific: Not for internal use. Do not apply to broken or abraded skin. Do not use when nursing or pregnant. 

Earth Apothecary

PLEASE COME IN AND ENJOY A CUP OF TEA OR TAKE SOME HOME!!! We ALSO sell the ORGANIC herbs individually and the ORGANIC teas as well for you to take home!!!

We are proud to offer our Earth Apothecary with a large selection of herbs, teas, spices, and so much more.  Many of these products can be used as spices, medicinal, aromatherapy, and teas.

Hot/Cold ORGANIC tea made to order:  You can come in and have a fresh herbal cup of tea made for you on the go or sit, relax, draw, read…which ever you prefer.  

Our current list of Organic herbs is as follows:

REFERENCES

Medical Herbalism by David Hoffmann
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD004504.pub3/abstract;jsessionid=8A54420B03E2C5E7BF99334E6E7B0D14.d03t01

 

 

 Slippery Elm BarkUlmus rubra   

  Origin: USA
Native Americans used soaked slippery elm bark as a natural bandage, allowing to dry over wounds. Many tribes also wrapped slippery elm around stored food to prevent spoilage. Slippery elm also served as a food during famine and for making porridge for small children and elderly persons.

Teas, infusions, poultices. Up to 5 tablespoons (15 grams) of slippery elm bark can be dissolved in a cup (240 ml) of water. Sometimes found encapsulated and as a liquid extract.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: Slippery Elm should be taken with at least 250mL (8 oz) of liquid. Other drugs should be taken 1 hour prior to or several hours after consumption of slippery elm. The mucilage may slow the absorption of orally administered drugs.

 

 White Willow Bark Native American healers used willow bark long before Columbus or the Vikings landed. The conversion of willow bark to aspirin began in 1828 when German chemist Felix Hoffmann isolated the active ingredient and named it salicin. In 1899, the Bayer company began manufacturing and selling a modified form of the willow bark chemical acetylsalicylic acid, or aspirin. This first of the modern miracle medicines has been a mainstay in the treatment of joint pain ever since. Most commonly used in tea preparations, and equally convenient as a capsule or extract. Also used to make lozenges, and salicin tablets.

 

Specific: Do not use if allergic to aspirin or other salicylate-containing drugs. Do not administer to children or adolescents with viral infections due to the possibility of Reye’s syndrome.

 

Lavendin Flowers

The use of Lavender goes back thousands of years, with the first recorded uses by the Egyptians during the mummification process. Both the Greeks and the Romans had many uses for it, the most popular being for bathing, cooking, and as an ingredient in perfume. Lavender was used as an after-bath perfume by the Romans, who gave the herb its name from the Latin lavare, to wash. During the Great Plague of 1665, grave robbers would wash their hands in a concoction called Four Thieves Vinegar, which contained lavender, wormwood, rue, sage, mint, and rosemary, and vinegar; they rarely became infected. English folklore tells that a mixture of lavender, mugwort, chamomile, and rose petals will attract sprites, fairies, brownies, and elves. Teas, tinctures, and added to baked goods. Cosmetically it has a multitude of uses and can be included in ointments for its beneficial properties.

 

SUMMARY

As a spice, lavender is best known as an important aspect of French cuisine and is an integral ingredient in herbs de Provence seasoning blends. Lavender may be used on its own to give a delightful, floral flavor to desserts, meats, and breads. The flowers can also be layered within sugar to infuse it with its distinctive aroma for use in cookies and candies.

Similar to cilantro, some individuals perceive the taste of lavender in a manner that is undesirable within cuisine. An estimated 10% of the population interprets lavender to have a soapy and unsavory flavor. For this reason, it may be wise to exercise caution while using lavender as a flavoring agent.

Lavender has been thought for centuries to arouse passions as an aphrodisiac, and is still one of the most recognized scents in the world.

Peppermint Leaf

Peppermint is one of the most popular herbs in teas, candies, and chewing gums. Tea is the most common and best employed use of this ingredient.

The oil is used as flavoring in toothpaste, dental creams, mouthwash, cough candies, chewing gum, and baked goods.

The oil of peppermint offers its cool, refreshing flavor and unmistakable aroma to a wide variety of foods and beverages. In the western world it is a common ingredient for candies, toothpastes, ice creams, pies and other desserts. The peppermint leaf itself is muddled and added to cocktails, and is a popular ingredient in herbal teas when dried.

 

 Echinacea Angustifolia

It was used for situations ranging from swellings to distemper in horses. This healing herb was administered as a fresh juice, herbal smudge or smoke, and often either the leaf or root was simply chewed on.5 Echinacea was used traditionally for supporting the immune system and also for topical use.

 

Immune supporting, depurative, vulnerary, lymphatic, sialagogue6

Root fresh or dried as a tea or tincture or powdered and encapsulated
All aboveground parts fresh or dried as a tea or tincture or powdered and encapsulated
Fresh plant juice

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: Persons with allergies to other members of the Asteraceae family should exercise caution with Echinacea, due to the presence of Echinacea pollen.

 

Chamomile

Chamomile promotes relaxation and supports digestive health.*

BREWED COLOR AND TIME

Light yellow. 4-5 minutes

 

Valerian Root

Valerian promotes healthy relaxation and sleep.

Teas, tinctures and capsules. Many people find the taste unpleasant and prefer to take it as a capsule or extract.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: Caution is advised during the use of barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and other sedative drugs, as valerian has the potential to increase the effects of some sedatives.

 

Ginkgo Leaf

Ginkgo leaf promotes healthy blood circulation.* The leaves are considered “sweet” and have a gentle effect. They can be used in teas, capsules, and extracts.
Use in persons with coagulation disorders should be under the supervision of a qualified healthcare practitioner.

 

Disclaimer:  These statements has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. For educational purposes only.